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Understanding NIST, NICE, NICCS:
How MILE2 uses these national standards to create and map our cybersecurity courses.

NIST -

National Institute of Standards and Technology

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was founded in 1901 and is now part of the U.S. Department of Commerce. NIST is one of the nation's oldest physical science laboratories. Congress established the agency to remove a major challenge to U.S. industrial competitiveness at the time—a second-rate measurement infrastructure that lagged behind the capabilities of the United Kingdom, Germany, and other economic rivals.

 

From the smart electric power grid and electronic health records to atomic clocks, advanced nanomaterials, and computer chips, innumerable products and services rely in some way on technology, measurement, and standards provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

 

Today, NIST measurements support the smallest of technologies to the largest and most complex of human-made creations—from nanoscale devices so tiny that tens of thousands can fit on the end of a single human hair up to earthquake-resistant skyscrapers and global communication networks.

HIGHLIGHTS:

– Established in 1901 and is part of U.S. Department of Commerce

– Establishes Standards for existing, new, and emerging technologies

– Companies can use the NIST standards as a blueprint for information security protocols. 

NICE -

National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education

Developed in partnership with NIST and CISA the NICE Cybersecurity Workforce Framework is the foundation for increasing the size and capability of the U.S. cybersecurity workforce. It provides a common definition of cybersecurity, a comprehensive list of cybersecurity tasks, and the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to perform those tasks.

 

One of the biggest challenges is the lack of consistency in the way “cybersecurity” is defined. Job descriptions and titles for the same job roles vary from employer to employer. This makes it harder for universities and colleges to prepare students for their first job. Employers spend time and resources retraining new hires and employees don’t have clear career options.

 

By using the Framework:

     -  Educators can create programs that are aligned to jobs.

     -  Students can graduate with knowledge and skills that employers need.

     -  Employers can recruit from a larger pool of more qualified candidates.

     -  Employees will have portable skills and better defined career paths and opportunities.

     -  Policy makers can set standards to promote workforce professionalization.

HIGHLIGHTS:

– The NICE framework is developed by NIST and CISA

– NICE categorizes cybersecurity job rolls 

– Job rolls are broken down into knowledge, skills, and abilities.

– Educators, workers, employers, and trainers can utilize the framework

NICCS -

National Initiative for Cybersecurity Careers and Studies

The National Initiative for Cybersecurity Careers & Studies (NICCS) is the nation’s one-stop shop for cybersecurity careers and studies. It connects the public with information on cybersecurity awareness, degree programs, training, careers, and talent management. As of February 2020, the Training Catalog connects the public to over 5,000 courses every day.

 

Cybersecurity professionals are in high demand. Experts predicts there will be a global shortage of 1.8 million cybersecurity professionals by 2022 to fill those critical positions. With this cybersecurity talent shortage, educators are uniquely positioned to help students develop the technical skills to pursue careers in this industry.

 

As technology advances, the United States must develop a workforce of effective cybersecurity professionals. The substantial investment made by the U.S., in programs like NICCS, helps citizens find the education and training they need to advance their careers and close the skill gaps in the cybersecurity workforce.

HIGHLIGHTS:

– Training organizations submit their courses to NICCS

– NICCS maps courses according to the NICE Framework

– Interested parties can search NICCS for training.

– A central hub for connecting students to training opportunities

So, Basically:

NIST

NIST sets national standards for all types of technology and emerging technology.

Cybersecurity is just a small part of the technologies NIST oversees.  They also cover advanced communications, artificial intelligence, health and bioscience, infrastructure, quantum science, and any other area where technologies are use.

NICE

Has developed a blueprint that shapes the way educators, students, and employers talk about cybersecurity. It was developed in partnership with the NIST, the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Department of Homeland Security.   The NICE Framework provides a consistent way to organize how we think and talk about cybersecurity.

NICCS

NICCS connects prospective students, educators and employers to cybersecurity training that has been mapped to the NICE Workforce Framework.  

NICCS categorizes the training submitted into the 7 areas identified in the NICE Framework.

NICE CYBERSECURITY WORKFORCE FRAMEWORK

The NICE Framework organizes cybersecurity work into categories, specialty areas, work roles, and tasks according to Knowledge, Skills and Abilities (KSAs). It provides a common language to speak about cyber roles.  Cybersecurity is an emerging and evolving technology, so having a common language to use when talking about training is important.  Therefore, Mile2 has mapped our courses to the NICE Framework so that our training will match national expectations.

Anyone can use the interactive NICE Framework map and filters to search for courses offered in their local area so they can add to their skill set, but we took the extra step of listing each Mile2 Approved NICCS Courses in the table below to make your search even easier.

Analyze

Performs highly-specialized review and evaluation of incoming cybersecurity information to determine its usefullness for intelligence

Collect & Operate

Provides specialized denial and deception operations and collection of cybersecurity information that may be used to develope intelligence.

Investigate

Investigates cybersecurity events or crimes related to information technology system, networks and digital devices.

Operate and Maintain

Provides the support, administration, and maintenance necessary to ensure effective a information technology system security.

Oversee and Govern

Provide leadership, management, direction, or development and advocacy to conduct cybersecurity work

Protect and Defend

Identify, analyze, and mitigate threats to internal infomormation technology systems and/or networks.

Securely Provision

Conceptualizes, designs, procures, and/or builds secure information technology systems and is responsible for aspects of system development.

Categories, Specialty Areas, and Work Roles

Within the NICE Framework, there are seven categories, each comprising of several specialty areas. Additionally, within each specialty area, there are a set of work roles. Each work role has Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSAs) required for the role, as well as tasks performed by the role. This organizing structure is based on extensive job analyses that groups together work and workers that share common major functions, regardless of job titles or other occupational terms.

N.I.C.E Workforce Framework Color Codes

Mile2 NICCS Approved Courses

Proficiency

Expert

Learning Options

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Advanced

C)DFE

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Expert

C)DRE

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Expert

C)CSA

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Basic

C)HT

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Expert

C)HISSP

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Advanced

C)IHE

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Expert

C)ISMSLA

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Expert

C)ISRM

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Expert

C)ISSA

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Advanced

C)ISSO

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Advanced

C)ISSM

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Advanced

C)NFE

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Basic

C)NP

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Basic

C)OST

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Expert

C)PTC

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Advanced

C)PTE

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Expert

C)DRE

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Expert

C)PSH

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Advanced

C)PEH

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Intermediate

C)SP

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Expert

C)SWAE

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Basic

C)SA1

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Basic

C)SA2

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Expert

C)SLO

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Advanced

C)VE

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Intermediate

C)VA

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Expert

IS20

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Advanced

ISCAP

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

Intermediate

RedVBlue

Instructor-Led
Self-Study

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